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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

4 edition of Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems found in the catalog.

Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems

Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems

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  • 16 Currently reading

Published by International Water Management Institute in Colombo, Sri Lanka .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Irrigation water.,
  • Rice -- Irrigation.,
  • Agricultural productivity.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementL.C. Guerra ... [et al.].
    SeriesSWIM paper,, 5
    ContributionsCatasús Guerra, Luis., International Water Management Institute.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsMicrofiche 2002/63020 (S)
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationv, 24 p.
    Number of Pages24
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6873877M
    ISBN 109290903694
    LC Control Number00410462

      About 60 per cent of the country’s rice area is irrigated, accounting for 75 per cent of production, but also by guzzling disproportionately large volumes of water. growing season. With this water management technique, the potential to produce more rice with less water from irrigated systems would provide opportunities to conserve water resource and improve food security. Saturated soil culture (SSC) In SSC, the soil is kept as close to saturation as possible. This mostly means that a.

    "Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems," IWMI Books, Reports H, International Water Management Institute. Bouman, B. A. M. & Tuong, T. P., "Field water management to save water and increase its productivity in irrigated lowland rice," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages , July. In Asia, lowland rice is grown on more than 30% of the irrigated land and accounts for 50% of irrigation water (Barker et al., ). Freeing only a small portion of water from rice areas can have large social and environmental effects if this water is used for urban, industrial, or environmental by:

    For instance, the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), which increases productivity by making use of certain types of soil and nutrients, enables farmers to produce more rice using less water. The traditional rice farming system, with flooded “paddies” and a cascading flood system, works best with land that is close to absolutely flat and an unlimited water supply. This is one reason the primary rice production areas moved west from the coast — there were great areas of large expanses of flat fields and excess water for irrigation.


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Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems Download PDF EPUB FB2

2 Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems the irrigation system. In the next section, we discuss the concepts of efficiency and productivity for the use of irrigation water. We then analyze the gaps, and their causes, between water requirement (evapotranspiration demand of the rice crop) and water use on-farm and in the irrigation.

But the potentials for new water resource development projects and expanding irrigated area are limited. We must therefore find ways to increase the productivity of water used for irrigation.

This paper reviews the literature on irrigation efficiency and on the potential for increasing the productivity of water in rice-based systems.

Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems. By L. C This paper reviews the literature on irrigation efficiency and on the potential for increasing the productivity of water in rice-based systems.

It stresses the continuing confusion over the concepts of irrigation efficiency and water productivity. in irrigated rice. More Rice, Less Water—Integrated Approaches for Increasing Water Productivity in Irrigated Rice-Based Systems in Asia.

Plant Production Science: Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. Cited by: depends largely on the irrigated rice production system: more than 75% of the rice supply comes from 79 million ha of irrigated land.

To produce 1 kg of grain, farmers have to put 2 to 3 times more water in rice fi elds than in those growing other cereals, and, in Asia, the amount of water used to irrigate rice.

strategies for producing more rice with less water Rice is life for more than half of humanity. It is the grain that has shaped the cultures, diets, and economies of billions Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems book people in the world. Abstract. The System of Rice Intensification (SRI) developed in Madagascar increases yields substantially, 50% to % or more, while requiring only about half as much water as conventional rice.

Tuong TP, Bouman BAM, Mortimer M () More rice, less water-integrated approaches for increasing water productivity in irrigated rice-based systems in Asia.

Plant Prod Sci – doi: /pps CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: More rice with less water can only be achieved when water management is integrated with (i) germplasm selection and other crop and resource management practices to increase yield, and (ii) system-level management such that the water saved at the field level is used more effectively to irrigate previously un-irrigated or low-productivity by: The present and future food security of Asia depends largely on the irrigated rice production system: more than 75% of the rice supply comes from 79 million ha of irrigated land.

To produce 1 kg of grain, farmers have to put 2 to 3 times more water in rice fields than in those growing other cereals, and, in. iii Preface iv 1 Rice and water 1 Rice environments 1 Irrigated lowlands 1 The rice field and its water balance 1 Groundwater under rice fields 5 Rice water productivity 5 Global rice water use 7 Water scarcity in rice-growing areas 8 2 The plant-soil-water system 11 Water movement in the soil-plant- 11 atmosphere continuumFile Size: 3MB.

Growing More Rice With Less Water Date: Octo the study found that the system of rice intensification (SRI) method has helped increase yields by over 30% — four to.

The water crisis is threatening the sustainability of the irrigated rice system and food security in Asia. Our challenge is to develop novel technologies and production systems that allow rice production to be maintained or increased in the face of declining water availability.

This paper introduces principles that govern technologies and systems for reducing water inputs and increasing water Cited by: Producing More Rice with Less Water in Irrigated Systems (Guerra et al., ). 2 Rice plants grown conventionally but under well-drained soil conditions can give a yield. Producing more rice with less water is therefore a formidable challenge for food, economic, social and water security of the region.

Asia is relatively well endowed with water resources, but water resources per inhabitant are only slightly above half of the world’s average. Technical support in upgrading irrigation systems for efficient. "Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems," IWMI Books, Reports H, International Water Management Institute.

Handle: RePEc:iwt:bosers:h as. Abstract. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is grown in at least countries of the world, and more than 50 of them produce equal to or more thant year−1.

About million tons (mt) of rough. Farmer recycle the captured water and use it to maintain the flood, or they pump it back into the main reservoir to use at a later time.

Check back every Wednesday to learn more about other irrigation systems used on the farm, the science of rice after the flood is established and much more in the From Riceland Farms series.

Producing more rice with less water from irrigated systems. Colombo, Sri Lanka: International Irrigation Management Institute (IIMI) v, 24p. [SWIM paper 5. Abstract. Over the past decade, we have witnessed a growing scarcity of and competition for water around the world.

Producing more rice with less water. SWIM Paper 5. Colombo, Sri Lanka: International Water Management Institute. / irrigation management / water use efficiency / crop production / water requirements / water balance / rice / water distribution / irrigated farming / productivity /.

Since the early's, when modern rice production technologies became available, more than 90% of the total irrigation water developed in south and southeast Asia is used for rice culture.

But currently rice culture is highly inefficient in water use. As fresh water availability for agriculuture is becoming increasingly scarce, greater efficiency of water use in rice culture is deemed Cited by: MORE RICE WITH LESS WATER THROUGH SRI --the System of Rice Intensification1 irrigated rice cultivation and can produce substantial increases in yield.

more space, rice root systems become larger and more extensive, acquiring more nutrients from the Size: KB.However, despite the constraints of water scarcity, rice production must rise dramatically over the next generation to meet the food needs of Asia’s poor. Producing more rice with less water is therefore a formidable challenge for the food, economic, social and water security of the Region.